Boddington’s Adventures

Remember, the first day of a hunt is as good as the last.

 

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How to make sure you and your rifle are ready for hunting season.

By Craig Boddington

The “exams” that the fall seasons bring us can’t really be crammed for, so I hope you’ve whiled away some of the summer doldrums at the shooting range. If you haven’t, you’re coming up on your last chance to make sure both you and your equipment are ready for whatever challenges lie ahead.

This really is a two-part evolution: You and your rifle. Getting rifles ready is a series of mechanical processes that have almost nothing to do with field shooting, while getting you ready is a matter of practice. The latter is much more time-consuming and should be ongoing--but let’s first talk about rifle readiness, and then we’ll come back to practicing for hunting season.

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All travel has its risks, so do your best to be prepared for them.

By Craig Boddington

Hunting is supposed to be fun, and it’s also, statistically, more injury-free than a lot of other hobbies and sports. There are, however, irrefutable principles to keep in mind. First is Murphy’s Law, “whatever can go wrong will,” and then there’s the corollary to Murphy’s Law: When something does go wrong it’s most like to happen at the worst possible time. There’s also the simple reality that, despite the very best preparations and precautions, bad things can and occasionally do happen to good people. I’m not a gloom and doom guy, and I don’t spend a lot of time brooding over stuff that might happen, but it’s always wise to keep the famous Boy Scout motto in mind: Be prepared!

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The .300 Winchester Magnum is versatile, effective, and widely available.

By Craig Boddington

The 7mm Remington Magnum was introduced in 1962, the .300 Winchester Magnum a year later, in 1963. Remington’s Big Seven took off like a rocket, and for many years was the world’s most popular cartridge to wear the “magnum” suffix. The .300 Winchester Magnum was slower to catch on. There were reasons for this. Cartridge design theory has it that a cartridge case needs a “full caliber neck” to properly grip the bullet. This means a .30-caliber cartridge should have a neck of at least .308-inch. In order to cram as much powder space as possible into a case that would fit into a .30-06-length action, Winchester’s engineers gave it a 2.620-inch case, longer than the 2.494-inch case of the .30-06, but with a short neck of just .264-inch.

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Safaris in central and west Africa are not for everyone, but they provide great rewards for the adventurous.

 

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