Boddington’s Adventures

All travel has its risks, so do your best to be prepared for them.

By Craig Boddington

Hunting is supposed to be fun, and it’s also, statistically, more injury-free than a lot of other hobbies and sports. There are, however, irrefutable principles to keep in mind. First is Murphy’s Law, “whatever can go wrong will,” and then there’s the corollary to Murphy’s Law: When something does go wrong it’s most like to happen at the worst possible time. There’s also the simple reality that, despite the very best preparations and precautions, bad things can and occasionally do happen to good people. I’m not a gloom and doom guy, and I don’t spend a lot of time brooding over stuff that might happen, but it’s always wise to keep the famous Boy Scout motto in mind: Be prepared!

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The .300 Winchester Magnum is versatile, effective, and widely available.

By Craig Boddington

The 7mm Remington Magnum was introduced in 1962, the .300 Winchester Magnum a year later, in 1963. Remington’s Big Seven took off like a rocket, and for many years was the world’s most popular cartridge to wear the “magnum” suffix. The .300 Winchester Magnum was slower to catch on. There were reasons for this. Cartridge design theory has it that a cartridge case needs a “full caliber neck” to properly grip the bullet. This means a .30-caliber cartridge should have a neck of at least .308-inch. In order to cram as much powder space as possible into a case that would fit into a .30-06-length action, Winchester’s engineers gave it a 2.620-inch case, longer than the 2.494-inch case of the .30-06, but with a short neck of just .264-inch.

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Safaris in central and west Africa are not for everyone, but they provide great rewards for the adventurous.

 

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Is big-game hunting in Africa on its way out? A veteran safari hunter doesn't think so.

By Craig Boddington

"African hunting is in trouble!" During the convention season just past I heard that line a number of times. Far worse, I heard it stated that “African hunting is on the way out.” That’s a bleak prediction not just for our hunting world, but also for African wildlife. Is it true?

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It's rare that a hunter is faced with a buffalo charge, but it can happen, and you must be ready.

By Craig Boddington

Robert Ruark had it right. The Cape buffalo does look at you like you “owe him money.” He is a magnificent animal, always tough and sometimes incredibly brave, and he has a fearsome reputation. The reality, however, is that facing a determined charge is not a normal end to most buffalo hunts. Hunting in the 1950s and early 1960s, when bag limits were much higher than today, Ruark shot a lot of buffalo. I believe there is a passage where he stated that he had taken more than a hundred, and in the period he hunted in I don’t question the number. Although badly mauled by a leopard (in India, not in Africa), I don’t recall Ruark relating a first-person account of a genuine close call with a buffalo.

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