Africa

A new study of game management areas in Zambia highlights the importance of the meat provided to local communities by hunting outfitters.

by Diana Rupp

When hunters travel to Africa for a safari hunt, their friends back home often wonder what happens to the meat of the animals they kill. If you’ve been on an African safari, you know that some of the meat is eaten in camp. But most of it, especially in the poorest and most rural areas of the continent, is given to the local communities, where it is a crucial addition to the otherwise protein-deficient diet of much of the populace.

Until now, there have been few, if any, scientific studies attempting to quantify the amount of game meat that goes to local communities and the impact it has. That has changed with a just-published study of three game management areas (GMAs) in several regions of Zambia that assessed the quantity and impact of sport-hunted meat provided to the local communities between 2004 and 2011.

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Announcing a unique buffalo hunt opportunity in South Africa for a conservation-minded hunter.

 

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How the most famous man-eaters in the history of Africa ended up in the city of Chicago.

by Diana Rupp

The man-eaters of Tsavo, as they can be seen today on display in the Field Museum in Chicago. Photo courtesy of the Field Museum.

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Threats from antihunters have now cost Namibia’s rhino conservation program hundreds of thousands of dollars.

 

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Any mature kudu bull is a trophy to be proud of.

By Craig Boddington

The greater kudu is perhaps the most recognizable of Africa’s antelopes, certainly one of the most impressive, and for most first-time African hunters, near the top of the wish list. Today the “plains game safari” is the most common African hunt, and the majority of plains game safaris are conducted in Namibia and South Africa. Despite his reputation as the “gray ghost” the greater kudu is the most plentiful and most widespread large antelope in southern Africa, so most hunters will get a chance at a greater kudu during the course of their safari.

However, their chances of actually getting that long-dreamed of kudu are much better if their expectations are realistic. In this terribly trophy-conscious world of ours, too many hunters are running around with measuring tapes in their pockets and their heads filled full of particular dimensions. This seems to apply more to some animals than others, and it certainly applies to the greater kudu.

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